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Anthropological Fieldwork Online: Archival Collections

Bronislaw Kasper Malinowski Papers

Bronislaw Kasper Malinowski Papers Bronislaw Malinowski Papers

Best known for his research in the Trobriand Islands of Papua New Guinea, Malinowski went into the field for the first time in 1914, returning for multi-month trips over the next four years. In 1922, he published his seminal ethnography, Argonauts of the Western Pacific, based on this research. The study was one of the first to examine the Kula Ring, generalized exchange and gift economies. One of the founders of modern-day anthropology, Malinowski advanced participant-observer methodologies, as well as theoretical contributions, to functionalism.

The Bronislaw Malinowski Papers (held at the London School of Economics and Yale): The collection will include over 12,000 pages of field notebooks, journals, early manuscript drafts, and correspondence from his research in the Trobriand Islands, 1915-1918, as well as notes and drafts leading up to the publication of Argonauts of the Western Pacific in 1922.

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The papers consist of correspondence, manuscripts of writings and lectures, fieldwork notebooks, photographs, memorabilia, and other papers of Bronislaw Malinowski, cultural anthropologist, teacher, and author. These materials reflect in some detail various aspects of Malinowski's research and other professional work in the areas of cultural anthropology and ethnobiology as well as his professional and personal associations with anthropologists, psychologists, and sociologists in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the United States. Of particular interest are the field notebooks, photographs, and other materials related to his work among the natives of New Guinea and the Trobriand Islands. Also included are some papers of members of Malinowski's family. Correspondents of note include Havelock Ellis, Sir James Frazer, Marie Bonaparte, Ernest Jones, Elton Mayo, Charles G. Seligman, and Edvard Westermarck. No material may be published without the prior permission of both the copyright holder and the Library. All applications for publication must be made to the Archivist in the first instance, but responsibility for ensuring copyright clearance rests with the user.

Dates Covered: 1862 -- 1999
Holding Institution: London School of Economics and Political Science
Archive: London School of Economics and Political Science. Library. Archives and Special Collections Team
Finding aid url: http://archives.lse.ac.uk/record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=MALINOWSK

Dates Covered: 1869 -- 1942
Donor: Valetta Swann, Ronald Waterbury
Holding Institution: Yale University. Sterling Memorial Library
Archive: Yale University. Sterling Memorial Library. Manuscripts and Archives
Finding aid url: http://hdl.handle.net/10079/fa/mssa.ms.0019

Digitized content from the LSE includes:

  • Series 1: Papers relating to Malinowski's studies of the Trobriand Islands
  • Series 2: Trobriand Islands fieldwork notebooks and notes
  • Series 5: Linguistic notes and lectures, based on Trobriand Islands fieldwork
  • Series 6: Seminar and Lecture Papers
  • Series 20: Early drafts, notes and writings
  • Series 27: Correspondence with Charles Seligman

The finding aid can be found here.

Digitized content from Yale includes:

  • Box 24: Field books

The finding aid can be found here.

*Please note: Box 24 from Yale fills gaps in Series 2 from LSE

 

Malinoswki Use Cases

Photo of Bronislaw Malinowski

Margaret Mead Papers and South Pacific Ethnographic Archives, 1838-1996

Margaret Mead Papers and South Pacific Ethnographic Archives, 1838-1996

Margaret Mead Papers and South Pacific Ethnographic Archives, 1838-1996

Margaret Mead is arguably one of the most prolific and influential anthropologists of the 20th century. With over 50 years of contributions to the scholarly record, Mead undertook her first field expedition in 1925 and was still publishing as late as 1975, a few years before her death. Her first field expedition to Samoa, between 1925 and 1926, resulted in a trove of materials focusing on child-rearing practice and gender roles in Samoa, as well as the widely read and critiqued ethnography, Coming of Age in Samoa. Mead returned to the field a few years later, conducting joint research with Reo Fortune in Papua New Guinea, between 1928 and 1929, and again between 1931 and 1932. Soon after, she published Sex and Temperament in Three Primitive Societies.

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The collection consisting of personal, professional, and family papers, correspondence, notebooks, organization files, appointment books, writings, teaching and office files, field notes, photographs, and miscellany relating primarily to anthropological and ethnological fieldwork, Mead's association with various universities and other cultural, scientific, and educational institutions, and her interests and activities in the broader areas of race, technological change, overpopulation, and peace. Also includes papers of Mead's associates and colleagues.

Dates Covered: 1838 -- 1996
Donor: Mary Catherine Bateson
Holding Institution: United States. Library of Congress
Archive: United States. Library of Congress. Manuscript Division
Finding aid url: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.mss/eadmss.ms009117

The Margaret Mead Papers (Library of Congress) contains about 40,000 pages curated from the South Pacific Ethnographic Archives, including:

N1 – N4: 1925-1926, Mead field trip, Samoa

Description: Field data, notebooks, note cards, and written analysis of fieldwork from the Samoa expedition. Subjects covered include: household information, myths, kinship and lineage, and test results. Margaret Mead is the sole and primary author of the field data. Also included is correspondence between Margaret Mead and Franz Boas, William Churchill, the Mead family, the National Research Council, and Mead’s Samoan informants.

N40 – N49: 1928-1929, Mead and Reo Fortune field trip to Manus, Admiralty Islands

Description: Field data, field notebooks, and written analysis of fieldwork from the Admiralty Islands expedition in Papua New Guinea. Subjects covered include linguistics, religion, kinship, social organization, children’s drawings, and material culture. Some notes are written exclusively by Mead, others are written exclusively by Fortune, and others are written jointly by both Mead and Fortune. Also included is correspondence between Mead and her family, and Bronislaw Malinowski.

N92 – N103: 1931-1933, Mead and Reo Fortune field trip, New Guinea

Description: Field data, field notebooks, and written analysis of fieldwork from the New Guinea expedition with the Arapesh, Mundugumor and Tchambuli peoples. Subjects covered include kinship, social organization, linguistics, material culture, economic systems and census materials. Some notes are written exclusively by Mead, others are written exclusively by Fortune, and others are written jointly by both Mead and Fortune.

 

Margaret Mead Collection Photo

Max Gluckman Papers

 

Max Gluckman Papers

Max Gluckman Papers

Max Gluckman, born in South Africa, founded the Manchester School of Anthropology in the late 1940s, bringing a case study approach unprecedented in qualitative research. He was one of the first scholars to bring conflict theory into elements of anthropological analysis, drawing from broader Marxist theories and analyzing elements such as power differentials, inequality, class conflict and ideology and of the structural approaches of Radcliffe-Brown and Evans-Pritchard. He was also the director of the Rhodes Livingstone Institute in Northern Rhodesia, developing it into a major center of British anthropological research. Gluckman conducted his PhD research and much of his later research with the Rhodes Livingston Institute with the Lozi of Barotseland in modern-day Zambia.


The Max Gluckman Papers (held at the Royal Anthropological Institute): The collection will include over 13,000 pages of field notebooks, journals, correspondence, research papers and organizational documents from Gluckman’s time with the Rhodes Livingstone Institute. The collection focuses on Gluckman’s early fieldwork with the Zulu and later work with the Lozi, with a scope from the mid-1930s through the mid-1940s.

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 The Max Gluckman Papers include field notebooks, journals, correspondence, research papers and organizational documents from his early research as a Ph. D. student, as well as his later research with the Rhodes Livingstone Institute. The collection was previously uncatalogued and there is no finding aid available.

Dates Covered: 1924 -- 1947
Donor: Mary Gluckman

Holding Institution: Royal Anthropological Institute

Archive: Royal Anthropological Institute. Archives and Manuscript

The collection was previously uncatalogued and there is no finding aid available. The lettered boxes correspond to Gluckman’s research with the Zulu, and the numbered boxes correspond to his research with the Lozi and the Rhodes Livingston Institute.

 

Gluckman Use Case

Max Gluckman Papers

Raymond Firth Papers

Raymond Firth Papers

Raymond William Firth Papers
Renowned as an economic anthropologist, Raymond Firth's lifelong fieldwork with the Tikopia, beginning in 1928, led to the classic ethnography "We the Tikopia: A Sociological Study of Primitive Polynesia". His later work with the Malaya in the late 1930s, conducted in partnership with his wife Rosemary Firth, formed the foundation for a number of ethnographic and theoretical works integrating economic and social systems.

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Papers relating to Sir Raymond Firth's research and professional career, including field notes and papers relating to Firth's research on the Tikopia, the Malayan peasantry and the New Zealand Maori; field notes and papers relating to Firth's studies of London kinship; texts of lectures and seminar papers delivered by Firth; subject files compiled by Firth; papers relating to relating to Firth's involvement with various academic and professional institutions; correspondence with professional colleagues and others.

The collection also includes field notes, diaries and other papers relating to Rosemary Firth's research on the domestic economy of the Malayan peasantry.

Dates Covered: 1901 -- 2000
Donor: Sir Raymond Firth
Holding Institution: London School of Economics and Political Science
Archive: London School of Economics and Political Science. Library. Archives and Special Collections Team
Finding aid url: http://archives.lse.ac.uk/TreeBrowse.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&field=RefNo&key=FIRTH

The Raymond Firth Papers (held at the London School of Economics): The collection will include approximately 20,000 pages of field notebooks, journals and early draft manuscripts from Firth's research in Tikopia and Malaya, late 1930s through the 1950s, including follow up research visits.Digitized content from the LSE includes:

• Series 1-1: Tikopia 1928-1929: Tikopia Field Notes
• Series 1-2: Tikopia 1928-1929: Diaries and Other Notes
• Series 1-3: Tikopia 1952 and Tikopia Census
• Series 1-4: Tikopia 1966 Field Notes and Diaries
• Series 1-5: Other Tikopia Field Notes
• Series 1-8: Tikopia Correspondence
• Series 1-9: Tikopia and Solomon Islands Other
• Series 2-1: Malaya 1939-1940 Field Notes
• Series 2-2: Malaya 1947 Field Notes
• Series 2-3: Malaya 1963 Field Notes
• Series 2-4: Rosemary Firth's Malaya 1939-1940 Field Notebooks and Diaries
• Series 2-5: Rosemary Firth's Malaya 1963 Diary and Field Notebooks
• Series 2-7: Malaya: Other Papers

The finding aid can be found here: http://archives.lse.ac.uk/TreeBrowse.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&field=RefNo&key=FIRTH

 

Raymond Firth Papers example

Ruth Fulton Benedict Papers

Ruth Fulton Benedict Papers Ruth Fulton Benedict Papers
Ruth Benedict made significant contributions to the field in her exploration and examination of the role of individuals in relation to larger societies and cultures, and her integration of analysis of personality and individual agency in cultural description. She published her major work, "Patterns of Culture" in 1934, a comparative work that integrated her own work and others. After WW II, Benedict began studies in Europe among refugees and in the United States among refugees and also among New York neighborhoods, pioneering community action anthropology. She developed the concept of synergy and influenced her student, Abraham Maslow, in his psychological work.

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Personal and professional papers consisting of correspondence, diaries, notebooks, manuscripts and typescripts, articles, speeches, financial papers, reports, teaching materials, and photographs. Correspondents include Franz Boas with whom she studied and worked. Subjects include American Anthropological Association, Progressive Education Association, West Side Defense Council (New York City), Council Against Intolerance in America, American Association of University Women, American Folklore Journal, Mary Wollstonecraft, Indians of the American Southwest including Pima, Zuni, Dakotas, Sioux, and Shoshone, civil rights, and Japan and Japanese culture. Other items include her published and unpublished poetry; grant proposals; correspondence, clippings, and reports from field work, including her Mescalero trip, 1931-1932; and a draft of Margaret Mead's An Anthropologist at Work.

Dates Covered: 1905 -- 1948

Institutional Donor: Estate of Ruth Fulton Benedict

Holding Institution: Vassar College

Archive: Vassar College. Libraries. Archives and Special Collections Library

Finding aid url: http://specialcollections.vassar.edu/collections/manuscripts/findingaids/benedict_ruth.html#d0e32

The Ruth Benedict Papers (held at the Vassar College Archive, to be open access): Approximately 8,000 pages from the Benedict archive will be made open access and include notes from various field expeditions, including trips with the Pima, Serrano and Zuni throughout the 1930s.

The finding aid can be found here.

Digitized content includes:

Series XI: Native American Subject Files

Box 79: Mescalero Trip

Box 80: Pima Mythology

Box 81: Pima Mythology

Box 82: Acoma Drawings

Box 83: Myths Typescript

Box 84: Myths Typescript

Box 85: Zuni Notes

Box 86: Dakota Sioux – Social Organization and Blackfoot Field Trip, 1939

Box 87: Religion of the North American Indians, Notes

Box 88: North American Indian Folklore

Box 89: Southwest Myth Concordance

Box 90: Southwest Myth Concordance

Box 91: Southwest Notes

Box 92: Concordance for Shoshone Folklore Notes

Box 93: Concordance for Shoshone Folklore Notes

Box 94: Concordance for Shoshone Folklore Notes

Box 95: American Indian Mythology Field Notes

Box 96: Serrano Field Trip Notes

The finding aid can be found here.

 

 

Ruth Fulton B Field Notes

The Papers of Victor Witter Turner

The Papers of Victor Witter Turner

The Papers of Victor Witter Turner
Victor Turner and Edith Turner's fieldwork with the Ndembu in the former Northern Rhodesia led to Turner's ethnography "Schism and Continuity in an African Society: A Study of a Ndembu Village Life", and to later theoretical works such as "The Ritual Process: Structure and Anti-Structure" and "Dramas, Fields and Metaphors: Symbolic Action in Human Society". His fieldwork was instrumental in shaping later theoretical work on symbols, rites of passage and ritual, which gave rise to concepts such as liminality, a state of being "in between" through which individuals pass at transitional periods of life often bounded by rituals or rites of passage. Together with his wife, Edith Turner, he took anthropology into hitherto neglected areas of study.

The Victor Turner Papers (privately held): The collection includes over 5,000 pages of field notes, field photos and early manuscript drafts from the Turners' research in the former Northern Rhodesia with the Ndembu between 1950 and 1954, as well as lectures, articles and draft manuscripts that subsequently followed.

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The Papers of Victor Witter Turner contain fieldnotes and photographs made by Victor and Edith Turner during two separate research trips among the Ndembu, in the Mwinilunga District of former Northern Rhodesia. The first trip was completed between 1950 and 1952, and the second trip was completed between April 1953 and May 1954. The collection also contains subsequent fieldwork analyses, indexes, lectures, manuscript drafts and related writings by Victor Turner during the 1950s and 1960s.

Dates Covered: 1950 -- 1970
Holding Institution: Turner Estate
Archive: Private Collection

Digitized content includes:

Box 1: Field Notes made by Victor and Edith Turner on a Research Trip among the Ndembu, Mwinilunga District, Northern Rhodesia, 1950-1952
Box 2: Field Notes made by Victor and Edith Turner on a Research Trip among the Ndembu, Mwinilunga District, Northern Rhodesia, 1950-1952
Box 3: Field Notes made by Victor and Edith Turner on a Research Trip among the Ndembu, Mwinilunga District, Northern Rhodesia, Second Trip, April 1953-May 1954
Box 4: Field Notes made by Victor and Edith Turner on a Research Trip among the Ndembu, Mwinilunga District, Northern Rhodesia, Second Trip, April 1953-May 1954
Box 5: Draft Manuscripts
Box 6: Draft Manuscripts
Box 7: Field Photographs
Box 8: Field Photographs
Box 9: Field Photographs

 

Turner Use cases #1

Turner Use Case #2

Playlist: Victor Turner - Scholarly Process

This playlist demonstrates how Victor Turner’s studies of rituals and ceremonies among the Ndembu unfolded through the full scholarly process. Beginning with field notes, Turner organized his observations around themes and indexed them. In a later stage of analysis, he pieced the field notes together in order to recreate chronological events and to analyze the temporal structure. He then integrated the same field notes in various iterations of lectures and draft book manuscripts. The playlist also includes photographs as part of his field documentation process, as well as correspondence from the field between Turner and Max Gluckman.

Firth Playlist Link

Victor Witter Turner Papers